"Cross for the Garden of Delight", 2013, Murano glass, skeleton of a snake

“Our future is a skeleton.” A conversation with Jan Fabre ahead of the “Glass and Bone Sculptures 1977-2017” exhibition in Venice

It took Jan Fabre over 40 years to conceive what I was about to see in April at the Abbey of San Gregorio in Venice. The Belgian artist’s fascination for the themes of metamorphosis, life and death is well documented, and on this specific occasion, a collateral event of the 57th International Art Exhibition – Read more about “Our future is a skeleton.” A conversation with Jan Fabre ahead of the “Glass and Bone Sculptures 1977-2017” exhibition in Venice[…]

Detail of the Photorama Lumière at the "Lumière! The Invention of Cinema" exhibition.

The Lumière Brothers and Kienholz’ Assemblages: Two Must-See Exhibitions in Bologna and Milan

[Scroll down for the Italian version] During the upcoming Christmas holidays you might feel the need to take a break from the traditional gargantuan (at least in Italy) meals. So here are a couple of tips to move your attention a bit from the stomach to the brain. But be advised: the following two exhibitions Read more about The Lumière Brothers and Kienholz’ Assemblages: Two Must-See Exhibitions in Bologna and Milan[…]

Sculpture by Nathan Sawaya from "The Art of The Brick".

From The LEGO Bricks to The Big Wave: Two Exhibitions I Saw in Milan

[Scroll down for the Italian version] After my trip to Japan I came back to Italy and spent a few days in Milan, trying to feel the vibe of the city through its cultural offer. I’d have much to tell you about, but there are two exhibitions that I particularly enjoyed. As a child, I Read more about From The LEGO Bricks to The Big Wave: Two Exhibitions I Saw in Milan[…]

"Regards", 2013. Printed Veils, light bulbs, wire, electric wire.

Christian Boltanski at the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

[Scroll down for the Italian version] Typhoons can be quite persuasive and at some point you have to give up. While the aftermath of a tropical storm was hitting Tokyo just as I was visiting the city last September, partially ruining my plans, I had to think of alternative indoors activities. If you have been Read more about Christian Boltanski at the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum[…]

Pierluigi Vecchi, "Transform 1" (2016)

CosmoGRAFIES

[Scroll down for the Italian version] I have always thought that there is a difference between being an artist and making art for a living. Each of us can create art and take the time we need to craft our skills when we’re off from work. But make a living out of art, and by Read more about CosmoGRAFIES[…]

The Man Who Bears the Cross by Attilio Maranzano

The Man Who Bears the Cross

There is a peculiar contradiction at the heart of Belgian artist Jan Fabre‘s latest project, ‘The Man Who Bears the Cross’. As a reflection on the relationship between heaven and earth, it is first of all an intimate dialogue within the self and an unspeakable dimension. But being an installation hosted in the Cathedral of Read more about The Man Who Bears the Cross[…]

Jan Fabre, "Cross with Snake, II" 2012.

From the Venice Biennale to Belgian Scarabs: What Struck My Eye Last Month

Here we are: with the coming months already full of new projects about to start, before jumping into workshops, masterclasses and lectures I just wanted to take a moment to share with you three pictures I took in the past weeks, as they sum up different forms of art I have experienced in August. I Read more about From the Venice Biennale to Belgian Scarabs: What Struck My Eye Last Month[…]

Marco Lusini, "Untitled" – from Oneiric Landscapes | Acrylic | 80 x 80 cm | 1982 | Private Collection

“Marco Lusini: The Colours of the Human Soul” Opens Tomorrow at Fiumano Fine Art Gallery

What immediately strikes you while going through Italian artist Marco Lusini’s biography (1936-1989), are the many art forms he experimented with before finding his ideal medium, painting. Photography, lithography, illustration, black ink drawing, not to mention sculpture and poetry, were all fertile ground in which the Siena-born “astronaut of inner space”, as Riccardo Belloni defined Read more about “Marco Lusini: The Colours of the Human Soul” Opens Tomorrow at Fiumano Fine Art Gallery[…]

The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death: © Image courtesy of Corinne Botz and Benrubi Gallery.

Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime

It’s cool, free, and the closest experience to a proper crime scene investigation that you can (legally) get. A few years ago, when I was researching the impact of death in the media for my Ph.D. project, Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime would have been a gold mine, given the fact that it provides really Read more about Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime[…]

Poster for the exhibition 'Inventing Impressionism', on display at The National Gallery until 31 May.

‘Inventing Impressionism’: How Dealer Paul Durand-Ruel Created One of the Most Enduring Trends in the Art Market

When you’re an artist who’s desperately trying to make it, no matter in which discipline, there is something more important than having good press coverage, your own space to create, the budget to set up your first show, or even the money to pay the bills. All of these are key success factors for sure, Read more about ‘Inventing Impressionism’: How Dealer Paul Durand-Ruel Created One of the Most Enduring Trends in the Art Market[…]

"The Snake Charmer" by Henri Rousseau (1907).

From France to The Jungle of Imagination: Henri Rousseau’s “Archaic Candour”

A few years ago I was writing the dissertation for my BA in Communications delving into the History of Cinema. I approached this field by focusing on a very specific film: Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. Vittorio Storaro’s mesmerising cinematography struck my eye immediately and I started to research what influenced the Italian “master of Read more about From France to The Jungle of Imagination: Henri Rousseau’s “Archaic Candour”[…]

How to introduce an audience to the masterpieces of The National Gallery.

Why Audiences Matter: The National Gallery Told Through Frederick Wiseman’s Documentary

Being a member of The National Gallery I have already seen its amazing permanent collection many times, as well as quite a few exhibitions (recently, “Rembrandt – The Late Works”). However, I had never had the chance to go behind the scenes and discover how the whole museum works. Thanks to Frederick Wiseman’s documentary National Read more about Why Audiences Matter: The National Gallery Told Through Frederick Wiseman’s Documentary[…]

"Project for a monument", 1972. 51 x 38,5 x 25 cm. © Successione Miró by SIAE 2014.

Joan Miró: “The Creative Impulse” Exhibition

Let’s face reality: your child does not draw like a conceptual artist or an abstract painter. Usually it’s the other way round: artists can replicate the childlike way of drawing. I say this because I was recently visiting a non-figurative exhibition and I heard the same old comment from a parent, pronounced with a dismissive Read more about Joan Miró: “The Creative Impulse” Exhibition[…]

Dennis Hopper, “Irving Blum and Peggy Moffitt”, 1964

In the Middle of Everything: Dennis Hopper and “The Lost Album”

An American photojournalist gone insane in the middle of the jungle, waiting for the crew of a boat with arms wide open: to me this character from Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now is still the most iconic among those Dennis Hopper portrayed onscreen. Coincidentally or not, besides being a director and a painter, the actor Read more about In the Middle of Everything: Dennis Hopper and “The Lost Album”[…]

Portrait of Gordon Parks: photographer, writer, musician and director. © The Gordon Parks Foundation.

Gordon Parks’ “American History”, or Why Style Can’t Be Taught

Muhammad Ali, Malcolm X, Ingrid Bergman, Duke Ellington, Glenn Gould, Paul Newman: some of the most iconic portraits of celebrities, artists and human rights activists of the 20th century were taken by a self-taught photographer born into poverty and segregation in Kansas. Gordon Parks (1912-2006) is probably the most important African American photographer in the Read more about Gordon Parks’ “American History”, or Why Style Can’t Be Taught[…]

Danny Lyon on the back cover of the re-issue of "The Bikeriders".

From Sub-culture to Pop Culture: “The Bikeriders” Ride Again

In the last few years Sons of Anarchy has proved to be one of the most successful American TV series. Its seventh and final season will be airing in September in the U.S. Now might then be the best time ever to be a fan of outlaw motorcycle clubs on the screen. Not long ago Read more about From Sub-culture to Pop Culture: “The Bikeriders” Ride Again[…]

"Pyramidi" project featuring a dedicated song by Will.i.am, on display at Barbican Centre for the "Digital Revolution" exhibition.

How Many Digital Revolutions? The Hottest Exhibition on Tech and Creativity at Barbican Centre Is the Right Place to Get the Answer

Videogames, interactive documentaries, VFX: whether you are a media archaeologist, a nostalgic lover of game consoles from the 1980s, a curious investigator of wearable technologies or a fan of the latest hi-tech blockbuster, there is only one place to be in London this summer: the Barbican Centre, home until 14 September to the Digital Revolution Read more about How Many Digital Revolutions? The Hottest Exhibition on Tech and Creativity at Barbican Centre Is the Right Place to Get the Answer[…]

“Project Syria” by Nonny de la Peña showcased at Victoria and Albert Museum

Does Future of Journalism Lie in Immersive Virtual Reality Experiences? A Close Look at “Project Syria”

Living conditions in a refugee camp or in a street devastated by a bomb sound abstract to the majority of us. What if technology allowed people to experience these scenarios in an immersive environment, reproducing real events through actual audio, video and photographs taken at the scene? Nonny de la Peña calls this technology-driven opportunity Read more about Does Future of Journalism Lie in Immersive Virtual Reality Experiences? A Close Look at “Project Syria”[…]

Chris Marker at Whitechapel Gallery

Chris Marker: A Grin Without a Cat

“In another time I guess I would have been content with filming girls and cats. But you don’t choose your time.” Chris Marker Judging by some of the works displayed at his first UK retrospective, not to mention the title of the exhibition itself, Chris Marker really loved felines. I think the French artist and Read more about Chris Marker: A Grin Without a Cat[…]

"Nowhere to Run". Richard Mosse at The Photographers' Gallery, London.

Pink Is the Colour of War. Photographer Richard Mosse Documents the Congolese Conflict With Troubling Poetic Shade

When we’re asked about a colour to describe war, we hardly find ourselves thinking of bright pink. Yet this is the palette that Irish photographer Richard Mosse has chosen to describe the cycle of violence in Congo. His work on the topic is well known to the international public, at least since his exhibition The Enclave at the 2013 Read more about Pink Is the Colour of War. Photographer Richard Mosse Documents the Congolese Conflict With Troubling Poetic Shade[…]