A Regular of Cult Cinema

I suppose that, after three times attending the same event, one can be considered a ‘regular’, if not a ‘veteran’. Then this is the case for me at Cine-Excess, the conference and festival on global cult film traditions: I attended and presented a talk last year, and in 2011 this was my very first truly international conference as a PhD candidate and delegate outside my department and home country.

Cult cinema is quite an established field of research nowadays, and a major achievement of Cine-Excess is that it opened the doors to young researchers who can present papers and projects in development in a very welcoming and supporting atmosphere. And, most importantly, receive feedback from established names in the field.

Cine-Excess header

The 9th edition was hosted from 12th to 14th November at the University of Brighton. This year’s theme sounded particularly intriguing to me: ‘Historical Trauma, Hysterical Texts: Cult Film in Time of Crisis’. As usual, the plus of the event was that attendants could get a wide range of theoretical frameworks to approach cult cinema, as contamination across theories and fields of research is in the DNA of Cine-Excess. But a major merit was also the combination of academia and industry: industrial panels this time were focused in particular on co-production opportunities and transnational funds for cult films.

Poster for Eli Roth's 'The Green Inferno'

As far as I am concerned, I could only attend the opening day. I was part of the very funny panel ‘The Contaminated Screen: Zombie and Cannibals in Social Context’, where I presented a paper titled ‘Fear Will Eat You Alive: Exploring The Green Inferno in the Age of Social Media’. This was the second take of a research on the audience engagement around Eli Roth’s film that I am currently developing.

I’m now looking forward to knowing what the conference theme for next year will be: the title will be announced in the next few days and maybe there will be a fourth Cine-Excess for me in 2016.